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Re: [OT ish] Router vs Firewall - corporate environment
From: John Morrison <john.morrison101 () googlemail com>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2010 17:30:11 +0000

Martin,

If you have a Cisco router that is one of the newer ISR-type then you
can add the firewall feature set to get all the same rules as a
stateful firewall. Depending on the volume of traffic, for internal
use It may be enough.

If you have a large network and use Cisco 6500 series switches you can
plug in a Firewall Services Module and it will do firewalling as fast
as any Cisco dedicated device. As all the routing will be done in the
switch (including from your LANs to your Internet router) this is a
very good place to put it.

Personally I would use separate devices for firewalling Internet
access and internal networks. Use a dedicated firewall device to the
Internet and DMZs and depending on the size of the network and ISR for
internal networks, unless they are very large.

On 2 February 2010 13:38, martin <martiniscool () gmail com> wrote:
Hi all

We're in the process of planning to split up our corporate network -
ie, a subnet for servers, one for users, one for admins etc etc.
Although we have over 200 users, our internet connection is not at
this office, it goes over a WAN to another office and then via a proxy
(which is duly firewalled etc).  We have a cisco router at our site
which handles the WAN traffic etc.

Now a debate has started over whether we should use the router to
split up our network, or whether we should go to the extra expense of
buying a firewall to do this.  As I understand it, if I send a request
from subnet 1 to subnet 2 on port 80, the source port (is over 1024)
would have to be open for the reply to come back from subnet 2 to
subnet 1.  However, as firewalls are stateful, they do not require
this - I would just need to open port 80 to subnet 2.

Apart from the greater logging capabilities, this is the only reason I
can come up with to use a firewall.  Does anybody have any additional
suggestions as to why we should use a firewall ?  Or likewise, why a
firewall might not be necessary.

Thanks in advance for any help

M

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------------------------------------------------------------------------
Securing Apache Web Server with thawte Digital Certificate
In this guide we examine the importance of Apache-SSL and who needs an SSL certificate.  We look at how SSL works, how 
it benefits your company and how your customers can tell if a site is secure. You will find out how to test, purchase, 
install and use a thawte Digital Certificate on your Apache web server. Throughout, best practices for set-up are 
highlighted to help you ensure efficient ongoing management of your encryption keys and digital certificates.

http://www.dinclinx.com/Redirect.aspx?36;4175;25;1371;0;5;946;e13b6be442f727d1
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