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Re: WTF eEye Really?
From: J Roger <securityhocus () gmail com>
Date: Wed, 5 May 2010 11:27:36 -0700


And if the author is sincere and it was really his original intent, he
should refrain from blogging from now on...


I have a feeling his employer will see to that for the foreseeable future.
At least in a professional context representing them as a company.

If he really meant it as everyone that read the original post seemed to take
it, then he should have the balls to stand by what he said or admit he meant
it at the time but was wrong and has since learned different. Either one of
those options would be a mature way of handling the situation. Trying to
spin it as "what I said isn't what I really meant. What I really meant is
something so benign that no one could have a strong opinion about it and it
was really pointless to even blog about." comes across as insincere.

What do I know though, Mr. Haber is the one with the lifetime in the
vulnerability assessment field.

JRoger


2010/5/5 Sébastien Duquette <ekse.0x () gmail com>

Looks to me more like the "unqualified person doing testing" argument
is used as an escape from their faux-pas.  When you read the initial
article, the author is clearly interested in the issue of crime being
perpetrated by using these tools :

"Penetration tools clearly allow the breaking and entering of systems
to prove that vulnerabilities are real, but clearly could be used
maliciously to break the law."

"There was tons of security around these systems and even possession
of tools to penetrate a system was a crime too."

In the new text, the author tells us that "what I hoped to convey was
the importance of well-managed testing under the watch of a user who
knows what they’re doing".

This looks like a lame PR attempt at stopping the shitstorm they
started by using the good old excuse this-is-not-what-I-meant.

And if the author is sincere and it was really his original intent, he
should refrain from blogging from now on...

S.


On Tue, May 4, 2010 at 11:48 AM, Mike Hale <eyeronic.design () gmail com>
wrote:
Looks like he rewrote it and clarified what he meant to say.

I think this is a lesson on why you really should proofread stuff and
ask someone else to go over your writings before you publish
something.

On Mon, May 3, 2010 at 5:44 PM, Sec News <secnewz () gmail com> wrote:
Did anyone else see this?


http://blog.eeye.com/vulnerability-management/penetration-tools-can-be-weapons-in-the-wrong-hands
"""
Penetration Tools Can Be Weapons in the Wrong Hands
Author: Morey Haber Date: May 3rd, 2010 Categories: Network Security,
Vulnerability Management

After a lifetime in the vulnerability assessment field, I’ve come to
look at
penetration testing almost as a kind of crime, or at least a
misdemeanor.

We enjoy freedom of speech, even if it breaks the law or license
agreements.
Websites cover techniques for jailbreaking iPhones even though it
clearly
violates the EULA for Apples devices. Penetration tools clearly allow
the
breaking and entering of systems to prove that vulnerabilities are real,
but
clearly could be used maliciously to break the law.

Making these tools readily available is like encouraging people to play
with
fireworks. Too bold of a statement? I think not. Fireworks can make a
spectacular show, but they can also be abused and cause serious damage.
In
most states, only people licensed and trained are permitted to set off
fireworks.

Now consider a pen test tool. In its open form, on the Internet,
everyone
and anyone can use it to test their systems, but in the wrong hands, for
free, it can be used to break into systems and cause disruption, steal
information, or cause even more permanent types of harm.

How many people remember the 80’s TV show Max Headroom? Next to murder,
the
most severe crime was if users illegally used information technology
systems
to steal information or make money. There was tons of security around
these
systems and even possession of tools to penetrate a system was a crime
too.
So what’s the difference?

Yes, it is just a TV show but in reality today we are in effect putting
weapons in people’s hands, not tracking them, and allowing them to use
them
near anonymously to perform crimes or learn how to perform more
sophisticated attacks. It all comes back to the first amendment and
Freedom
of Speech. I can write a blog of this nature, state my opinion about how
I
feel about free penetration testing tools, and assure everyone that they
need defenses to protect their systems, since free weapons are available
that can break into your systems – easily.
"""
WOW - am i the only one to go WTF to this?  Talk about alienating your
customers and shitting where you eat.
And to think i used to be a fan...
- Some anonymous ex-eEye fan
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Full-Disclosure - We believe in it.
Charter: http://lists.grok.org.uk/full-disclosure-charter.html
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_______________________________________________
Full-Disclosure - We believe in it.
Charter: http://lists.grok.org.uk/full-disclosure-charter.html
Hosted and sponsored by Secunia - http://secunia.com/

_______________________________________________
Full-Disclosure - We believe in it.
Charter: http://lists.grok.org.uk/full-disclosure-charter.html
Hosted and sponsored by Secunia - http://secunia.com/

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