Home page logo
/

pen-test logo Penetration Testing mailing list archives

RE: Penetration Testing - Human Factor
From: "Robert D. Holtz - Lists" <robert.d.holtz () gmail com>
Date: Wed, 23 Aug 2006 18:01:00 -0500

You make an interesting point about the occurrences going unreported.

I would have to agree that the majority never see the light of day.  I would
also go so far as to say that most folks don't even know when it happened to
them, i.e. nothing suspicious about the interaction.

With the technical side being covered by a wide variety of devices which do
nothing but help in trying to prevent attacks and logging everything this
would give this type of attack a much higher statistical average.  

Since there are no forensics for a human breach this type must be under
reported when reported at all.

I know it's real easy to call a help desk and have them reset a password!

-----Original Message-----
From: K K Mookhey [mailto:kkmookhey () gmail com] 
Sent: Wednesday, August 23, 2006 3:27 PM
To: Joey Peloquin
Cc: KeenerPB () mcnosc usmc mil; Pen-Testing
Subject: Re: Penetration Testing - Human Factor

Isn't it also about the fact that people are very hesitant to report
incidents where they've been taken for a ride, and more willing to admit
technical goof ups such as not applying a patch?

We've offered clients social engineering attacks as part of pen-tests,
and have found takers for these too. Having said that, I think
targeted financial fraud leveraging computer systems usually happens
with a very strong component of social engineering, whereas regular
hacking (with possible financial results) is usually almost purely
technical.

Just my 2c.

KK


On 8/23/06, Joey Peloquin <joeyp () cotse net> wrote:
 KeenerPB () mcnosc usmc mil wrote:
I would disagree with Arian regarding the technical aspects of "true"
hacking...in my experience, social engineering plays a huge role in
successful compromise of a network. Most of the time the boundaries
are
pretty tight so you have to lob one over the fence (social
engineering) in
order to punch out from the inside to defeat the boundary devices.

All due respect, I'm both an Enterprise pen-test customer and an
internal
pen-tester at the same company, and I don't see social engineering on
the
radar at all, save a mention as part of our security awareness program.

How many enterprises do you all contract with that *actually* include
social
engineering, and the like, in the scope?  We've paid as much as 40K for
an
engagement and it didn't include social engineering.

-jp

------------------------------------------------------------------------
This List Sponsored by: Cenzic

Need to secure your web apps?
Cenzic Hailstorm finds vulnerabilities fast.
Click the link to buy it, try it or download Hailstorm for FREE.
http://www.cenzic.com/products_services/download_hailstorm.php
------------------------------------------------------------------------





------------------------------------------------------------------------
This List Sponsored by: Cenzic

Need to secure your web apps?
Cenzic Hailstorm finds vulnerabilities fast.
Click the link to buy it, try it or download Hailstorm for FREE.
http://www.cenzic.com/products_services/download_hailstorm.php
------------------------------------------------------------------------


------------------------------------------------------------------------
This List Sponsored by: Cenzic

Need to secure your web apps?
Cenzic Hailstorm finds vulnerabilities fast.
Click the link to buy it, try it or download Hailstorm for FREE.
http://www.cenzic.com/products_services/download_hailstorm.php
------------------------------------------------------------------------


  By Date           By Thread  

Current thread:
[ Nmap | Sec Tools | Mailing Lists | Site News | About/Contact | Advertising | Privacy ]